Tag Archives: SABEW

Philly biz editor leaving for Smart Money

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Philadelphia Inquirer assistant managing editor of business Bob Rose is leaving the paper to take a job as executive editor of Smart Money magazine, according to a news release put out by the glossy. Rose will start on Nov. 30.

Smart MoneyRose had been Atlanta bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal before going to Philadelphia. So it’s not surprising he’s leaving. He was hired by Amanda Bennett, the Inquirer editor who stepped down earlier this month. Bennett is also a former Wall Street Journal Atlanta bureau chief.

“I’m thrilled to welcome Bob to the SmartMoney team,” said editor Jonathan Dahl in the release. “His fresh, newsy approach to both financial and consumer features will be a real asset to the magazine.”

While at The Philadelphia Inquirer, Rose worked with a staff of 25 reporters and editors. The paper’s business section won the 2005 “Best in Business� award from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

Before joining The Inquirer in April 2004, Rose was a reporter and editor at The Wall Street Journal for 19 years in New York, Chicago and Atlanta. As a Journal reporter, he covered personal finance, the financial futures markets, airlines, manufacturing and labor. As a Journal editor, he served as deputy bureau chief in Chicago, and a news editor on The Journal’s national desk in New York. From 2000 to 2004, he was The Journal’s Atlanta bureau chief, leading a staff of a dozen reporters and editors covering companies, industries, and issues in the Southeast.

Before joining The Journal, Rose spent three years as a reporter for a radio and telephone news service of Dow Jones and four years as a general assignment reporter for The Toledo Blade newspaper in Toledo, Ohio.

SmartMoney, The Wall Street Journal Magazine of Personal Business, was launched in 1992 by Hearst Corp. and Dow Jones & Co. Its current circulation is 817,746.

Did you get a column out of it?

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Albany Times-Union business editor Marlene Kennedy attended the SABEW fall conference in New York last week, and on her way back home, she called her husband, who asked the dreaded question every columnist doesn’t want to hear.

Marlene KennedyShe wrote, “My husband is asking that annoying question again. He knows it’s tough pulling off a weekly column on top of other responsibilities. (He knows because I tell him so — frequently.)

“‘Did you get a column out of it?’ He’s relentless.

“I start to drop names: Becky Quick of CNBC’s ‘Squawk Box’ was there; so was John Thain, head of the New York Stock Exchange. And Steve Forbes talked about taxes and health care over lunch.

“‘I shook Anne Mulcahy’s hand,’ I offer.

“‘Who?’

“The chairman and chief executive of Xerox Corp. was a keynoter on Tuesday. The conference was part practical sessions on covering issues like energy and the economy, and part question-and-answer time with high-profile speakers.

“Mulcahy had taken an empty seat beside me as she awaited her turn at the podium. Turning with a warm smile, she extended her hand: ‘Hi. I’m Anne Mulcahy.’”

Read more here.

Changes made to SABEW Best in Business contest

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Last year’s conversion to an electronic entry process for SABEW’s Best in Business context was such a hit that, for the upcoming contest in 2007, they’re going almost completely digital.

Here’s what’s changing:

If you’re entering the section contest, you’ll enter as you did last year: register your entry online, and then mail in four copies of each of the sections you’re entering. But if you’re entering any of the news contest categories — enterprise, breaking news, projects or columns — you’ll register the entry online, attach a pdf (or include several of them in a zip file, which we’ll tell you how to create), and that’s it – you’re finished. Nothing to copy or mail.

More details, and explicit directions, will be included in the Best in Business instructions to be posted on the SABEW web site soon.

Also new this year is one entry deadline: Feb. 1. Last year, SABEW created some confusion by having two entry dates — one to register and one to postmark your entries.

The first two mandatory dates for the 2006 section contest are Thursday, Feb. 16, and Sunday, Aug. 20. SABEW will announce the third mandatory date, and give you more information on the three dates you can choose, by the end of the year.

The mandatory date for the column contest is Wednesday, Feb. 8. Columnists who did not publish that date should submit the first column published AFTER Feb. 8.

Mills leaves Bloomberg and returns to Baruch

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Josh Mills, a SABEW board member who joined Bloomberg News this summer to start up its reporting of the world of education and how it intersects the business world, has left the wire service and is returning to Baruch College, where he previously taught journalism.

Josh MillsIn an e-mail, Mills said, “There are lots of great journalists there [at Bloomberg]. I’m impressed with a lot of the markets, finance and corp coverage. And I’m grateful that Matt Winkler and his team gave me the chance to see how well I could fit in. Baruch College/CUNY was kind enough to offer to take me back, and asked me to helped build the best undergrad journalism program in NYC. It’s a good challenge, and puts me back doing what I love most — training young journalists and then sending them out to all of you.”

Mills, director of the master’s program in business journalism at Baruch that came to an end with the beginning of the master’s program at CUNY, has worked as a business journalist for more than 20 years, half of that at The New York Times as an editor and reporter.

He has written about technology for Bloomberg News, Family PC, Home PC, Graphis and other publications and has written on a wide variety of subjects for Esquire, Rolling Stone, The Village Voice, New York, TV Guide, Stereo Review, Columbia Journalism Review and other publications. He has also worked as a reporter or editor at the Newark (N.J.) Star-Ledger, The Associated Press, The New York Post, the New York Daily News and Newsday.

Mills has long been involved in training journalists and for many years ran copy editing programs for the Dow Jones Newspaper Fund. More recently he served as the U.S. director of the Bertelsmann Summer Academy, a training program for German business journalists. Until recently, he was head of the education committee at SABEW.

SABEW unveils web site redesign

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The Society of American Business Editors and Writers unveiled a new web site Friday morning, just in time for the groups fall conference in New York City, which begins on Sunday.

Of particular interest to business journalists is the increased emphasis on training. There are new tip sheets under the training section that include how to cover a new company in town, how to write an earnings story, how to cover bankruptcy, how to determine if a company has been backdating stock options, and tips on covering the economy. These are similar to the tip sheets seen on the Investigative Reporters & Editors web site.

Also new are links along the right-hand column to other resources, such as PR Newswire and the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism.

Beginning next month, the news section on the web site will have more breaking news about the business journalism industry.

O'Bryon looks to increase biz news in new job

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Linda O’Bryon, who helped start the Miami-based “Nightly Business Report� television show back in 1979 now shown on more than 250 public TV stations, said in an interview that she will look at increasing the business news content at her new job as chief content officer for Northern California Public Broadcasting.

“They have a lot of coverage of the local community, and that includes business,â€? she says. “So that will be one of my goals, to develop more in the way of business. ‘Nightly Business Report’ has always talked about opening a West Coast bureau.â€?

Linda O'BryonO’Bryon, who in 2004 received the Distinguished Achievement Award by SABEW at the 41st annual conference in Fort Worth, Texas, will begin her new job on Jan. 2.

O’Bryon will report directly to Jeff Clarke, president and CEO of Northern California Public Broadcasting. O’Bryon succeeds John Boland, who recently left to assume the newly created role of chief content officer at PBS.

“I am going to miss Florida, but I am looking forward to the challenges in northern California,â€? O’Bryon told Talking Biz News on Tuesday. “It was a tough decision because I am very happy here and have a great team and enjoy working on ‘Nightly Business Report.’ But this is a new challenge and a new chapter and a wonderful community.â€?

O’Bryon’s new outfit doesn’t have a specific business show. She spearheaded the creation of “Nightly Business Report” in 1979, when she was serving as news director at the South Florida public television station, WPBT. When NBR launched for the first time in January 1979, she both managed the program and served as its co-anchor. The program was nationally syndicated in 1981 and remains the leading source of daily business news on television. NBR has been credited for spawning the genre of daily news programming broadcast and cable television.

As general manager of NBR Enterprises, the operating division at WPBT that produces business news, O’Bryon oversaw Nightly Business Report’s editorial and business operations. In addition to producing 260 daily news programs a year and a daily News Brief, NBR Enterprises also oversaw NBR’s international licensing, its web-site on PBS.org, and video production projects.

Biz writer Gerdel among those taking Plain Dealer buyout

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Longtime Cleveland Plain Dealer business writer Tom Gerdel is among those on the editorial staff of the paper who is taking a buyout offer and leaving the paper, according to a story in Wednesday’s paper.

Plain DealerReporter Teresa Dixon Murray wrote, “The newspaper will definitely feel the loss of some of its veterans, [Editor Doug] Clifton said, particularly reporters who have been covering Greater Cleveland for decades.

“A perfect example, he said, is 43-year veteran business reporter Tom Gerdel, who covers manufacturing and has extensive knowledge about the business community. Clifton said Gerdel has built up ‘a Rolodex of names and a lifetime of trust.’

“‘You always hate to see institutional knowledge go,’ said Clifton, who became The Plain Dealer’s editor in 1999. ‘On the upside, a fresh eye is sometimes helpful.’”

Read more here. Gerdel was known for his coverage of manufacturing and the steel industry. In 2005, he was part of a team of Plain Dealer reporters who won a SABEW Best in Business award for breaking news. He was also part of teams from the Plain Dealer in 2001, 2002 and 2003 that won a SABEW Best in Business award for breaking news or spot news.

Noblet explains AP's new Money & Markets offering

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Kevin Noblet, the business editor at the Associated Press, has been part of a team at the wire service examining how it can put together a new page for business sections as a replacement for the stock listings that many papers are cutting. Called Money & Markets, the new AP product is now rolling out into newspapers. Among the first to start using Money & Markets are papers in South Bend, Ind., and Buffalo, N.Y.

Noblet became business editor in 2004 after being deputy business editor since 2000. In a recent interview with Talking Biz News, Noblet, a SABEW board member, explained the new product. What follows is an edited transcript.

1. Can you explain what Money & Markets is?

It’s a new approach to presenting markets and investment information, a combination of analytical reporting, graphics and data with complementary print and online components. The print modules can be used individually or built into a standard page, or pages, which will be a daily destination for investment-minded readers. They’re complemented by online features that allow users to go deeper. These will help newspapers capture readership and build traffic on the Web, where they are in competition with Yahoo, Google et al. While traditional market agate is focused entirely on what happened yesterday (or last week for the weekend wraps), Money & Markets has key elements that are forward-looking and can be more useful and relevant for investors.

2. When did the AP start thinking about this new product?

We’ve been discussing possible alternatives for more than a year. We moved into high gear in the winter, with lots of research. Early this year we brought in Hal Ritter, a former ME for the Money section of USA Today, as a consultant to help guide the design of the product with input from many members and a large team of AP staff.

3. What were some of the factors in pushing for a new way to provide market information?

AP has been the principle supplier of data for markets tables in U.S. newspapers large and small, so we’re sensitive to the big cuts newspapers have been making in those pages. We saw a real danger that the investment-minded reader would abandon business sections entirely unless an innovative approach was developed, one that encompassed both the changing needs of print, including quality, convenience and a compact format, and the new requirements of online, where people also want depth and interactivity.

4. What options or modules does it provide for business sections?

Ease and flexibility of use are keys to how Money & Markets works. The standardized set of daily modules fall into three categories: 1. explanatory and analytical; 2. local and 3. those that offer a new twist on traditional agate. In the first category are items like the Centerpiece, which examines market news and trends, and Today, which lets readers know what to watch for in the day ahead and why. In the second category are a newspaper’s customized selection of local stocks, industry lists and related information. In the third, we offer compact selections in categories like currencies, commodities and interest rates. It all fits well with their A-to-Z tables, which of course newspapers still can offer to the extent they choose to. The modules can, however, be used in markets pages or elsewhere in the section – including on the business cover or even in other sections. There’s a lot of flexibility.

5. How is that information put together?

A Money & Markets team of two reporters, two graphic artists and an editor create the analytical modules, tapping into the larger AP’s resources for covering investment news, including our growing staff in New York and in bureaus around the country, and the world for that matter. The others are largely automated, like our customized tables data are.

6. What role did the newspapers play in the development?

A key one. We sought, and certainly got, detailed feedback on prototypes from a variety of big and small papers, through both a formal survey process and through informal contacts that are ongoing. Lots of AP staff, including marketing executives, bureau chiefs and technical staff, have been involved in this. Our Markets Information group has had a close relationship with markets editors at literally hundreds of member papers for years, and we’ve tapped into that as well. Even as we moved into production this month, we’ve been seeking and receiving suggestions on modifications and enchancements. That’s not going to stop.

7. How many papers have already signed up?

We started with a small group of beta customers, now numbering five, and there are a couple of dozen more still testing both the print and online services. There are even more in the wings — we’re hearing from more interested newspapers each day.

8. Is there anything similar from your competitors?

Some individual papers have designed pages or parts of pages that have similarities to Money & Markets. But there’s nothing quite like it, and certainly not from any other news agency.

9. Beside newspapers, who might benefit from Money & Markets?

Any news outlet, including broadcasters with a Web presence, would find it useful if they’re trying to build an audience of investors.

10. How has this affecting the staffing levels at the AP?

We’ve added the five Money & Markets positions already mentioned. They’re joining a Business News department that’s been steadily growing for more than two years, since we created AP Financial News, a premium investment-oriented news service. In New York and Washington alone, we’ve added more than 40 business reporter and editor positions, and we have plans to add more yet.

O'Bryon leaves NBR for California

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Linda O’Bryon, who helped start the Nightly Business Report television show back in 1979 that is now shown on more than 250 public TV stations, has been named the new chief content officer for Northern California Public Broadcasting.In 2004, O’Bryon received the Distinguished Achievement Award by the Society of American Business Editors and Writers at the 41st annual conference in Fort Worth, Texas

O’Bryon will report directly to Jeff Clarke, president and CEO of Northern California Public Broadcasting. O’Bryon succeeds John Boland, who recently left to assume the newly created role of chief content officer at PBS.

O’Bryon will lead the content divisions of a multimedia organization that includes more than 150 television and radio producers and programmers, editors, reporters, educators, web content developers, management and technical personnel at KQED, KTEH, and KCAH.

Linda O'BryonO’Bryon has been the senior vice president and general manager of NBR Enterprises/WPBT2 in Miami, which produces Nightly Business Report, distributed nationally by PBS on more than 250 stations. In that capacity, she has orchestrated worldwide distribution and content partnerships that have helped shape The Nightly Business Report into an international business news force around the world.

She spearheaded the creation of the program in 1979, when she was serving as news director at the South Florida public television station, WPBT. When NBR launched for the first time in January 1979, she both managed the program and served as its co-anchor. The program, celebrating its 25th anniversary of its national syndication this year, was nationally syndicated in 1981 and remains the leading source of daily business news on television. NBR has been credited for spawning the genre of daily news programming broadcast and cable television.

As general manager of NBR Enterprises, the operating division at WPBT that produces business news, O’Bryon oversees Nightly Business Report’s editorial and business operations. In addition to producing 260 daily news programs a year and a daily News Brief, NBR Enterprises also oversees NBR’s international licensing, its web-site on PBS.org, and video production projects.

Read more here. Read a Q&A I did with O’Bryon earlier this year about her business journalism career here.

 

Talking Biz News undergoes a redesign

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If you’re a regular reader of Talking Biz News, then you’ve noticed some changes in the past 24 hours. We’ve undergone a redesign just like many business sections have undertaken in the past year.

Unlike business sections, which are cutting stock listings, we’re not cutting anything. In fact, we’re trying to give you more — and in a more appealing fashion.

You’ll find a direct link to the Society of American Business Editors & Writers on the home page, for example. Just click on the SABEW logo on the right-hand side.

There are still some kinks to be ironed out. But everything should be back to normal by the end of the week.