Tag Archives: Redesigns

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Making business news and information light and approachable

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San Francisco Chronicle designer Christopher T. Fong chatted with Matt Petty, creative director of the San Francisco Business Times, which launches their redesign today. Petty joined the weekly business publication in December 2013 after spending 13 years with the San Francisco Chronicle as art director and, most recently, head of design for an S.F. marketing/advertising firm, Dial House.

Here is an excerpt:

What are some of the successes?

I think our biggest success is the cover, which has a cleaner presentation. It really gives us an opportunity to showcase the stories in that week’s issue in a more compelling way.

The typography is such a big improvement, both in readability and aesthetics, that it really sets the stage for some great design to happen.

I’m especially pleased with the way our new “The List” section looks. We do weekly lists about different business sectors. The new design really makes the dense amount of information feel light and approachable.

The executive profile page is not only a great read, but we’re now shooting the subjects with staff, so photography can shine here. In general, we’re giving more room to the photography. We have a talented crew, consisting of Spencer Brown and Paolo Vescia, who are great and creative portrait photographers as well as accomplished photojournalists.

Read more here.

San Francisco Business Times

Telling the story behind the headlines

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Mary Huss, the publisher of the San Francisco Business Times, writes about the redesign of the paper.

Huss writes, “This is much more than a redesign. It is a re-imagination of our news products and our organization, how we report and deliver the news, and how we connect with you, our reader.

“Because news doesn’t happen on a weekly cycle, we are a digital-first newsroom. Reporters break news when it happens rather than waiting for the print edition. If you’re not subscribing to our free daily e-news editions every day of the week, you are missing out on important breaking news and developments.

“The weekly edition allows us to add context to the most important breaking stories and tell the story behind the headlines. Our weekly edition will continue to be premium content, paid for by subscribers who get first access to lists, cover stories, profiles of entrepreneurs and leaders, leads and reporters’ takes on the people, trends and transactions that shape the main news of the week.

“Our re-imagined newsroom has brought new roles and job descriptions. Every reporter blogs, finds important new sources through social media, and is expanding skills in video and visual storytelling.”

Read more here.

San Francisco Business Times logo

San Fran Biz Times about to unveil redesign

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Jim Gardner, the managing editor of the San Francisco Business Times, writes about the upcoming redesign of the American City Business Journals paper.

Gardner writes, “The new design showcases features we’ve introduced to the Business Times in recent months, including: an in-depth cover story each week; expanded news coverage of the Bay Area’s key industries and vibrant startup economy; and fuller use of the data published in our popular weekly Top 25 lists.

“Digital readers will see our new logo debut on a new homepage. Print and digital readers alike will see sharper graphics and a crisp new look that makes it easier to find the stories you want, and helps to tell those stories visually.

“The changes are part of an ongoing evolution of the Business Times to make it a more powerful tool for executives, entrepreneurs and business leaders who help San Francisco and the Bay Area thrive. It’s all available on multiple platforms, so you can read it when, where and how you want it.

“What’s not changing: In print and online, we will remain your premier source of Bay Area business news — breaking stories on the deals, news and newsmakers who drive the Bay Area economy, and insightful analysis to help readers figure out what it all means.”

Read more here.

Portland Press Herald

How a Maine newspaper is increasing its business news coverage

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The Portland Press Herald/Maine Sunday Telegram has been amplifying its business coverage through key hires and a realignment of resources.

Earlier this month, the Press Herald hired me, former editor of Mainebiz, as business editor. Two weeks prior, veteran business reporter Whit Richardson joined the reporting staff, bringing the newspaper’s complement of business journalists to seven.

“Business news is a core component of any great newspaper, and we want to provide the broadest, deepest, most comprehensive business coverage in Maine,” said Steve Greenlee, managing editor. “That starts with hiring the best business journalists you can find, and we have done exactly that.”

The 40,000-circulation newspaper focuses on southern Maine and offers its readers in-depth business coverage of key Maine industries such as tourism, fishing and forest products, as well as southern Maine’s growing composites and technology cluster.

Richardson has focused on business reporting since 2007, and most recently was business editor for the Bangor Daily News. I spent five-and-a-half years at Mainebiz, a statewide, business-to-business publication, and five years before that as business reporter for the Sun Journal in Lewiston, Maine.

Rounding out the business team are J. Craig Anderson, formerly a business reporter with the Arizona Republic and the Business Journal of Phoenix; Jessica B. Hall, a 17-year veteran of Reuters, and longtime Press Herald reporters Tux Turkel,  Edward D. Murphy and Tom Bell.

Coultas has been a journalist for 30 years, spending the last eight reporting and writing about Maine businesses. As Mainebiz editor, she was responsible for all the editorial content published in print and online, and oversaw the editorial content of Mainebiz events and recognition programs. She has a special interest in reporting on banking, manufacturing and the Lewiston-Auburn area, where she spent 22 years of her career.

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Vancouver Sun revamps business section

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Harold Munro, editor in chief of the Vancouver Sun, writes about changes to its business section.

Munro writes, “You’ll notice the absence of a separate BusinessBC section today. Our Monday focus shifts to the popular Asia-Pacific page, now incorporated into the first section of your paper.

“Business coverage will be emphasized with deeper coverage in larger sections Tuesday through Saturday. The expanded BusinessBC section will include several new spotlight pages and you’ll see a weekly theme for each day, among them Mining, Energy and Small Business. The accompanying graphic highlights many of these new daily business features.

“Our goal is to provide more news and analysis about the people, companies and issues fuelling our vibrant Metro and Northern B.C. economy.

“In addition to the spotlight pages, our experienced team of Vancouver-based business reporters and columnists will bring you regular coverage of B.C.’s technology innovators, trends in residential and commercial real estate, agriculture and gardening, fisheries, the ethnic business community, tourism and much more.

“As part of our revamped Business section, columnist Shelley Fralic will write a weekly column on retail or, more specifically, her spendthrift ways as an unrepentant shopper under the appropriate label, Consumed.

Read more here.
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Dallas Morning News revamps biz coverage

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Bob Mong, the editor of the Dallas Morning News, writes Sunday about changes in the paper’s business coverage.

Mong writes, “On Tuesday, we introduce a redesigned Business section with a cleaner look and expanded content. A year in the making, the section is the work of a team of journalists and lots of good ideas from our readers.

“Look for a retooled markets page aimed at being more helpful to investors. Renamed Your Portfolio, you will find it more analytical and forward thinking. Readers also asked for bigger type, and Your Portfolio delivers.

“Readers also asked us to expand business and economic reports from around the nation and world. Beginning Tuesday, readers can find this new approach anchored on Page 2.

“We also are reintroducing Economy and You on Page 3 six days a week. This page features Kiplinger, one of the best sources for pocketbook advice. Michelle Singletary’s personal finance column will appear in Economy and You twice a week. I expect both to be hits.

“Sunday’s Business section features expanded space. ‘Your Sunday Business section will be fatter,’ noted business editor Dennis Fulton. ‘We’re keeping everything you say you like about the old section, plus newly expanded reports on personal technology and entrepreneurs.’”

Read more here.

Wall Street Journal

WSJ website about to reboot

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Joe Pompeo of Capital New York writes Thursday about an upcoming reboot of the Wall Street Journal website.

Pompeo writes, “Editors at the paper have been getting previews of the new wsj.com in recent weeks, though a spokeswoman said ‘the visuals are in no way final. They were shown as part of the consulting/feedback process.’

“She also said there’s no official launch date and that the changes will be rolled out iteratively.

“In any case, one person who’s seen the prototype described a cleaner homepage with less text, more photos and fewer navigation bars at the top. The spokeswoman said the new site will have a responsive design with ‘streamlined navigation.’

“The relaunch is part of a ‘digital transformation’ that Baker, writing in a Dec. 31 year-end memo, told Journal employees to expect in 2014. He also mentioned ‘new digital home[s], complete with additional digital and reporting staff’ for coverage areas including politics and policy; global markets and finance; arts & entertainment and China.

“The spokeswoman said those projects are still in the works.”

Read more here. A subscription is required.

Fortune 1930

Fortune magazine’s rich design history

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J.J. Sedelmaier writes for Print about Fortune magazine’s design history.

Sedelmaier writes, “Although it was conceived and prepared while financial times appeared stable, Fortune Magazine was first published soon after the market crash in 1929 by Time Magazine co-founder Henry Luce. Its cover price was set at $1 — the equivalent of more than $15 today. Luce made a conscious effort to make the magazine as majestic and beautiful as he felt possible. Illustrators, designers, and fine artists all contributed to Fortune‘s covers and editorial illustrations, and it also dovetailed the early use of photography — especially color photography. Margaret Bourke-White was an early contributor and Walker Evans was its photo editor from 1945–65. Much of what we take for granted in present day business and corporate news reporting was pioneered in Fortune Magazine. The detailed behind-the-scenes dealings of what went on in the business world were usually not made public up to this point, and although this was clearly a case of preaching to the choir, you’ll be hard pressed to find a periodical of the time that presented the equivalent coverage of corporate goings on.

“Everything in the magazine was served to its loyal subscription base (newsstand sales were considered a bonus) like a sumptuous meal. Start with a beautifully designed cover. Add in a short section of classy advertising. Feed on a main course of multiple feature stories (interestingly unrelated to the subject on the cover). Then, finish with another final passage of advertising. This was Fortune Magazine for at least its first 10-15 years.

“In 1999, ‘Fortune: The Art Of Covering Business’ was released by Gibbs Publishing. It chronicles the covers of Fortune Magazine from its inception to 1950. It’s a nice addition to any library stocked with titles concerning graphics and publication design, but it lists ‘Unknown Artist’ for several of the covers even though in some cases the artists’ initials are clearly evident on the artwork. With a bit of sleuthing, I was able to discover that the ‘Unknown Artist’ with the ‘EAW’ initials on the lower right of the April and July 1930 covers is Edward A. Wilson. My thanks goes to both Steven Heller and Roger Reed for helping me determine this information. (As of right now, only the March 1930 issue and the color aerial picture of NYC on the July 1939 cover continue remain uncredited with the ‘Unknown Artist’ moniker.) The other important item missing from the Gibbs book is at least a mention of the pre-production prototype issue produced in September 1929 and labeled as Volume 1 Number 0. This dummy issue has rarely been showcased before.  Other than my prior inclusion of it as an example of Stark Davis’ work in my feature on ‘Ravinia Festival Program Covers,’ the only other time I’ve seen a mention of the prototype is in 2010 when the University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill announced it had acquired a copy.”

Read more here.

Triad Business Journal

Triad Business Journal unveils redesign

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The Triad Business Journal, an American City Business Journals paper based in Greensboro, N.C., has redesigned itself.

Publisher Doug Copeland writes, “This week’s edition is the tangible result of the way we have changed every aspect of our news gathering and reporting organization. We’ve transformed into a digital-first organization. We know you need Triad business news all day long and that is what we are doing. We also know you rely on us for in-depth reporting and analysis, and that will always be at the core our news operation.

“So how have we done this? We’re bringing you breaking news online first and fast all day long. We’re delivering it to you twice daily with our Morning and Afternoon Edition emails, and also by our reporters delivering news throughout the day via Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Google+.

“Then our weekly edition continues the conversation with more detail, a deeper dive into the news, and by introducing you to the businesspeople you need to know.  And don’t forget our weekly business news report on WFDD and radio updates throughout the week. Then we top this off with our extensive calendar of business events– more than 17 this year – to bring the Triad’s leadership together.

“In my interaction with the business community I hear the same thing over and over. We get the story first. We get it right. And we are the most thorough news source available to them. I can’t express how proud I am of the work our reporting staff does and the kudos they’ve earned. It’s evidenced in this week’s issue.”

Read more here.

Boston Globe

Boston Globe to launch new real estate section

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The Boston Globe on March 30 will launch a new, expanded broadsheet real estate section, dubbed Address, the newspaper announced Thursday.

A story on NetNewsCheck.com states, “The 12-page weekly section replaces the paper’s existing tabloid real estate section, with new features, writers, columns, photos and visual elements.

“The new section will broaden the paper’s real estate focus, covering topics and trends relevant to anyone with an address: whether buyers or renters, empty-nesters, second-home buyers or millennials renting their first apartment, the Globe said.

“Address will include new features and columns that center on the lifestyle, rather than the business, of real estate. One carryover from the old section will be ‘Home of the Week,’ a popular feature by Globe reporter John Ellement.

Eileen Woods will be the editor of the new section. Woods, who has been with the Globe for 15 years, previously was a copy editor for the Boston Globe Magazine, where she wrote the ‘On the Block’ real estate column.”

Read more here.