Tag Archives: Personal finance coverage

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NerdWallet seeks lead editor

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NerdWallet grown steadily since 2009 and are looking to add a high-caliber editor who can spot prime coverage opportunities for all of our verticals. We cover all areas of consumer finance — banking, credit cards, education, health care, insurance, investments, mortgages, shopping, travel.

The right candidate will shape daily coverage, and help manage and make hires. We have a growing staff of writers and editors from outlets such as CNN.com, The WSJ and The Motley Fool.

This job requires:

  • At least five years in professional daily journalism
  • Strategic thinking about coverage, because we’re not a traditional news outlet and aren’t looking to compete with them
  • Someone who comes up with smart story ideas and knows how to effectively position them for media outlets and on social media
  • Someone who knows the media landscape well, including national and local outlets. (This job requires someone who already reads and watches news widely, and uses social media extensively.)
  • Someone with editing chops, who can front-load writers on story approach and potential sources, as needed
  • Someone with proven leadership skills

Bonus points for:

  • Personal finance background

What we offer:

  • Pay competitive with major news outlets’
  • 100% paid premiums for medical, dental and vision for employee, spouse and kids
  • 401(k) match
  • Generous allowances for learning and training
  • Generous, flexible vacation
  • Catered lunches daily
  • In-offices fitness classes
  • Paid commuter benefits
  • Friday happy hours
Lizzie O'Leary

“Marketplace Weekend” with O’Leary to launch in June

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Deborah Clark, the executive producer of the Marketplace portfolio of programs from American Public Media, sent out the following announcement on Wednesday:

I’m pleased to announce some exciting news from Marketplace.  The weekend of Saturday, June 28th, Marketplace is launching a new show called Marketplace Weekend. This new show will replace the current Marketplace Money program. Marketplace Weekend will be a one hour show and Lizzie O’Leary will be the new host.

Marketplace Weekend, like our other Marketplace shows, will live at the intersection of life and money.  Audience research continues to reinforce strong interest around personal finance coverage and we will continue that coverage  across all of our shows, not just on the weekend.

Marketplace Weekend will deliver on our core content coverage area of business and economic news.  We will be adding more technology coverage, a wrap-up and analysis of the week’s “Numbers”, interesting interviews and maintaining the strong and distinctive approach to personal finance and investing that has always been a hallmark of Marketplace Money. This will all be done with Marketplace’s fun, irreverent approach and gives the team a wider range of topics to explore for the weekend audience.

So, what will the show sound like? We’re developing new segments over the next couple of months. Marketplace Weekend will “do the numbers”, bringing its own spin to some of the biggest numbers of the week and showing how the macro economy impacts our everyday lives. As an example, in our segment on gentrification a couple of weeks ago,  Lizzie walked around the streets of Harlem talking to 34-year old Brittny Kone about the two Harlems she’s experienced, from her childhood to today, and how those changes have affected her own personal and financial decisions. (Download the mp3 of this story)

Since joining the Marketplace team last year, Lizzie O’Leary has become an integral voice of Marketplace. She is a phenomenal talent – the perfect combination of a versatile, engaged host and whip smart, dogged journalist. She is routinely called on by MSNBC, CNN and other media outlets for appearances and has a strong and commanding social media presence, which will be instrumental in developing the show’s new online and digital strategy.

We hope you’ll agree that this is a great evolution of our program. We’re confident your listeners will love these new elements of our weekend show.  The Marketplace Weekend team will have a pilot for you to listen to in the coming weeks. Stand by for further communication around that. In addition, Lizzie O’Leary will also be available for calls and interviews as we approach the launch of the new show.

WSJ_sunday

Changes coming to Sunday Wall Street Journal

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David Crook, the editor of The Sunday Wall Street Journal, writes about changes coming to the content that runs in metro dailies across the country.

Crook writes, “We’re happy to announce that veteran financial journalist Jonathan Clements is returning to Sunday Journal, where he will write weekly on investing and personal-finance issues.

“Longtime readers will remember Jonathan’s no-nonsense, down-to-earth advice was a mainstay of the Sunday Journal until his departure in 2008. New readers are certain to find Jonathan’s column a refreshing antidote to the blather that passes for investment advice on television, the Web and, too often, in print. Jonathan’s column will run online at MarketWatch.com.

“Here are some other changes to watch for:

“Carolyn T. Geer is refocusing her every-other-week Investing Basics column, personalizing it with stories from her own family along with stories from her friends and acquaintances, readers and, from time to time, even some boldface names.

“Anne Tergesen, who has long been writing an abbreviated retirement-related Encore item, will now write a full column, alternating with Tom Lauricella.

Jennifer Waters, who has been writing a monthly Personal Business column devoted to answering reader questions about Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and other government benefits, will now write every other week. Her column will be called Your Benefits. Starting Out, Health Costs and Careers will continue to appear on weeks when Your Benefits doesn’t run.”

Read more here.

SABEW

Personal finance should be biggest biz desk beat

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With roots and connections to every niche of business journalism, covering personal finance should be the biggest beat in the business, a panel of top journalists in the field said Friday morning.

But a misunderstood lack of variation in subject matter — on the surface — makes it seem repetitive and less relevant than other beats, they said.

“If you cover personal finance, you know there’s only about 14 stories out there,” said Liz Weston, a syndicated columnist on the topic. “We just keep changing the anecdotes.”

The panelists, moderated by MSN Money’s managing editor Marty Wolk, spoke Friday morning about the intricacies of the beat, why it interests them and why it’s important to the reader. The panel was at the annual Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference, being held Friday and Saturday at Arizona State University.

Interest in personal finance stories has been increasing, Wolk said, particularly as baby boomers near retirement age and realize that they’ll need to figure out how to pay health care costs and living expenses without a working income.

He said the task beat writers face is covering every scheme out there that separates people from their money.

“You need to define it more broadly,” he said. “You need to think about all the different ways that people spend their money, invest their money, and have their money at risk, even without really knowing it.”

CBS News writer and syndicated personal finance columnist Kathy Kristof said stories come from understanding and showing how broader policy changes and larger events affect individual readers.

“Each of us has a different story to tell,” she said, using the Affordable Care Act as an example of something that’s simultaneously helping some people and hurting others.

“The same event can affect your readers in a number of different ways, so if you know that, and you can dig into it, and you can know your beat so well that you can take that spectrum and explain how and why and what they can do about it… That, to me, is what personal finance is really all about.”

Cassella is a UNC-Chapel Hill business journalism student attending the SABEW conference on a Talking Biz News scholarship.

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NerdWallet hires COO, VP of talent

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Nerdwallet.com, a three-year-old personal finance website, has hired two executives to help manage its growth.

The San Francisco-based company has hired Dan Yoo to be its chief operating officer. Yoo comes from LinkedIn, where he led the company’s performance management, strategic initiatives and analytics.

Yoo helped LinkedIn’s annual revenues grow to more than $1.5 billion from $120 million and increase its members to 275 million from 45 million.

Meanwhile, NerdWallet has hired Flo Thinh as its vice president of talent. Thinh is one of the top recruiters in Silicon Valley.

Thinh built and led the recruiting team that scaled social-gaming startup Zynga to more than 3,000 employees from 40 in just four years. After Zynga, Thinh joined Khosla Ventures as an operating partner.

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NerdWallet.com seeks staff writers

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NerdWallet.com is growing and we’re adding full-time staff writers who will cover consumer finance topics such as credit cards, health, insurance, investments and the quality of life in cities across the country.

We’re looking for seasoned journalists who’ve consistently delivered on deadline and covered hard-news topics at daily news outlets or wire services. (Finalists will be tested.)

Please include work samples in your application.

Ideal candidates:

  • Have strong writing skills
  • Are detail oriented
  • Can juggle multiple projects under deadline
  • Have strong research and data analysis skills
  • Have great story ideas

To apply, go here.

 

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Nerdwallet.com seeks consumer finance editor

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Nerdwallet is looking to add an editor who will focus on banking and credit cards.

This job requires:

  • At least five years in professional daily journalism, preferably in business or consumer finance news
  • Strategic thinking about coverage, because we’re not a traditional news outlet and aren’t looking to compete with them
  • Someone who comes up with smart story ideas
  • Someone who knows the media landscape well
  • Someone with editing chops, who can front-load writers on story approach and potential sources, as needed

What we offer:

  • Pay competitive with major news outlets’
  • 100% paid premiums for medical, dental and vision for employee, spouse and kids
  • 401(k) match
  • Generous allowances for learning and training
  • Generous, flexible vacation
  • Catered lunches daily
  • In-offices fitness classes
  • Paid commuter benefits
  • Friday happy hours

To apply, go here.

 

nerdwallet-logo_300

Nerd Wallet seeks senior editor

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Nerd Wallet has grown steadily since 2009 and are looking to add a high-caliber editor who can spot prime coverage opportunities for all of our verticals. We cover all areas of consumer finance — banking, credit cards, education, health care, insurance, investments, mortgages, shopping, travel.

The right candidate will shape daily coverage, and help manage and make hires. We have a growing staff of writers and editors from outlets such as CNN.com, The WSJ and The Motley Fool.

This job requires:

  • At least five years in professional daily journalism
  • Strategic thinking about coverage, because we’re not a traditional news outlet and aren’t looking to compete with them
  • Someone who comes up with smart story ideas and knows how to effectively position them for media outlets and on social media
  • Someone who knows the media landscape well, including national and local outlets. (This job requires someone who already reads and watches news widely, and uses social media extensively.)
  • Someone with editing chops, who can front-load writers on story approach and potential sources, as needed
  • Someone with proven leadership skills

To apply, go here.

 

WSJ personal finance

WSJ seeks retirement reporter

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The Wall Street Journal’s personal finance bureau is seeking a New York-based reporter to cover retirement.

The natural candidate will be a skillful writer with a proven ability to generate news and features, be able to jump from big trend stories to news scoops and write with panache.

He or she should have a proven ability to develop deep sources within the industry and among government and advocacy groups.The candidate must have knowledge of issues related to retirement, including but not limited to insurance, employer-based savings plans and tax-advantaged retirement accounts, and elder care.

He or she will be expected to write Weekend Investor section-front and inside stories and blog posts, as well as stories for Page One and the Money & Investing front page.

Please attach a resume, cover letter and three to five published clips to your online application.

To apply, go here.

Lauren Young

Young switches to personal finance for Reuters.com

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Lauren Young, who had been the wealth management editor at Reuters, sent out the following change in her job:

Beth Pinsker and I have joined Reuters.com – again – to boost money/personal finance coverage on our website.

We will continue to create actionable content that’s valuable to our media and professional clients. And yes, those stories about retirement, saving for college and all the other stuff you’ve come to rely on will move through the copy desk and appear on the Reuters newswire. (Don’t worry: Linda will continue to write her popular Stern Advice personal finance column every other week, although she will no longer edit personal finance copy.)

I now report to Dan Colarusso, and Beth reports to me.

Personal finance is a top priority for the digital team in 2014. We’ve already made some changes to our page on Reuters.com, so please check it out: http://www.reuters.com/finance/personal-finance

On the Wealth front, Linda Stern will take sole charge of the wealth management team in Reuters News, reporting directly to Paritosh Bansal.