Tag Archives: Financial Times

FT’s subscriptions shows growth

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A strong set of circulation and audience figures from the first quarter of 2011 show that the Financial Times continues to grow its audience while attracting more paying customers for its content.

The business newspaper has a combined paid print and digital circulation of 605,402, up 1.4 percent on the previous quarter, for the first three months of the year.

This is comprised of the FT newspaper’s daily circulation and 224,000 paying FT digital subscribers, up 8.1 percent on the previous quarter.

In addition, the FT has a combined print and online average daily readership of 2.1 million people worldwide.

And FT.com has more than 3.4 million registered users.

The paper recently launched an advertising campaign to find more readers.

Read more here.

FT's subscriptions shows growth

by

A strong set of circulation and audience figures from the first quarter of 2011 show that the Financial Times continues to grow its audience while attracting more paying customers for its content.

The business newspaper has a combined paid print and digital circulation of 605,402, up 1.4 percent on the previous quarter, for the first three months of the year.

This is comprised of the FT newspaper’s daily circulation and 224,000 paying FT digital subscribers, up 8.1 percent on the previous quarter.

In addition, the FT has a combined print and online average daily readership of 2.1 million people worldwide.

And FT.com has more than 3.4 million registered users.

The paper recently launched an advertising campaign to find more readers.

Read more here.

FT launches ad campaign

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The Financial Times launched Monday an international advertising campaign that emphasizes the business newspaper as a source for global news and analysis.

The campaign was created by DDB and is comprised of print, online and television advertisements. The central image features the world’s iconic business buildings (FT cityscape) set upon a person’s fingertips, while accompanying text and voiceovers emphasize the FT’s multi-channel role in keeping its audience informed of how “events in one corner of the world” impact the state of affairs in another.

“This campaign underlines the FT’s commitment to provide trusted and authoritative business news, comment and analysis from a global perspective – available across multi-platforms, however, whenever and wherever you want it,” said Caroline Halliwell, director of brand and B2B marketing for the Financial Times, in a statement. “Global business news – literally at your fingertips.”

The print and online advertisements will appear in the Economist, Time, Fortune, Prospect, Foreign Policy, Technology Review, Fast Company and the Harvard Business Review. The campaign will run throughout 2011.

Read more here.

FT resisting giving over subscriber relationship to Apple

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The Financial Times wants to keep selling subscriptions for its digital news directly to readers rather than surrender control of new customers who sign up via Apple’s iPad, according to a Reuters story on Monday.

Georgina Prodham writes, “Apple’s hit tablet computer, the iPad, has become a major driver of new subscriptions to FT.com, thanks to its large and crisp display, possibilities for interactive features and affluent customer base.

“But the FT values direct relations with its customers which allow it to tailor advertising and products to its audience, and is resisting Apple’s efforts to channel them through the App Store.

“‘We don’t want to lose our direct relationship with our subscribers. It’s at the core of our business model,’ Rob Grimshaw told Reuters in an interview on Monday.

“He said he was hopeful of a positive outcome to negotiations with Apple, but added: ‘If it turns out that one or another channel doesn’t mix with the way we want to do business, there’s a large number of other channels available to us.’”

Read more here.

The FT’s online and mobile success

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Ian Burrell of The Independent in London writes Monday about how the success of the Financial Times in charging for online access is now being copied by other media.

Burrell writes, “Latest figures from the FT show it has 210,000 digital subscribers all paying a minimum of £250 for a year’s access to the title’s website and apps. ‘For a publication that circulates roughly 400,000 in print, that’s a big number, and we haven’t done that at knock-down prices, we have aggressively increased our prices for digital subscriptions over the past couple of years,’ Rob Grimshaw, the managing director of FT.com, says. When Grimshaw took up his post in 2007, an FT subscription cost just £99. Digital revenues grew by 56 per cent in 2010, helped by the growth of smartphones and tablets.

“That trend has just begun. ‘The mobile transformation could easily be larger in scale than the shift from print to desktop and it could happen at frightening pace,’ Grimshaw says. A recent survey of 2,500 FT registered users found that 45 per cent were accessing content via mobile devices. ‘The numbers were much bigger than any of us expected,’ he says. ‘You can only come to the conclusion that mobile will probably become the dominant channel.’

“Having previously focused on Apple products, the FT has shifted attention to Google’s Android. ‘Android has gone from zero to 30 per cent-plus penetration of the smartphone market in a couple of years,’ Grimshaw says. Within weeks the FT will make available its Honeycomb app for Android in time for the launch of a string of new tablet formats this year, starting with the Motorola Xoom this month.”

Read more here.

The FT's online and mobile success

by

Ian Burrell of The Independent in London writes Monday about how the success of the Financial Times in charging for online access is now being copied by other media.

Burrell writes, “Latest figures from the FT show it has 210,000 digital subscribers all paying a minimum of £250 for a year’s access to the title’s website and apps. ‘For a publication that circulates roughly 400,000 in print, that’s a big number, and we haven’t done that at knock-down prices, we have aggressively increased our prices for digital subscriptions over the past couple of years,’ Rob Grimshaw, the managing director of FT.com, says. When Grimshaw took up his post in 2007, an FT subscription cost just £99. Digital revenues grew by 56 per cent in 2010, helped by the growth of smartphones and tablets.

“That trend has just begun. ‘The mobile transformation could easily be larger in scale than the shift from print to desktop and it could happen at frightening pace,’ Grimshaw says. A recent survey of 2,500 FT registered users found that 45 per cent were accessing content via mobile devices. ‘The numbers were much bigger than any of us expected,’ he says. ‘You can only come to the conclusion that mobile will probably become the dominant channel.’

“Having previously focused on Apple products, the FT has shifted attention to Google’s Android. ‘Android has gone from zero to 30 per cent-plus penetration of the smartphone market in a couple of years,’ Grimshaw says. Within weeks the FT will make available its Honeycomb app for Android in time for the launch of a string of new tablet formats this year, starting with the Motorola Xoom this month.”

Read more here.

FT.com site to turn pink

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Lara O’Reilly of New Media Age writes that The Financial Times website will undergo a redesign aimed at boosting subscriptions and to make it look more like the printed paper.

O’Reilly writes, “The revamped FT.com site will show articles on a pink background – currently only the landing page is pink – and will also feature bigger graphics and videos, as well as ‘more intelligent’ linking on articles to steer readers to related content.

“In addition, the website’s search function will include blog and video content for the first time.

“FT.com managing director Rob Grimshaw said, ‘This is a major change to the look and feel of the site, which will make it much more readable and encourage more people to come and take a look.’

“The revamp is estimated to go live by the end of June this year.”

Read more here.

FT exec backs NYT's online pay model

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The New York Times unveiled Thursday its plans to begin charging readers to access some of its content online, following models that have been successfully used by business newspapers The Wall Street Journal and The Financial Times.

Rob Grimshaw, managing director of FT.com, has executed the FT’s strategy to successfully charge for its online content, an effort that began in 2000.

In response to the Times’ plans being unveiled on Thursday, Grimshaw issued the following statement:

The Financial Times believes in the value of quality content and our experience from the last three years is that a metered model is an excellent paid model, allowing access to new and casual users while building a healthy digital subscription business that doesn’t sacrifice traffic or advertising.

The FT pioneered the metered model in 2007 and we’ve seen both digital content and digital advertising revenues rise every year since. Last year, we experienced record growth in online subscribers, double-digital growth in online advertising, and overall digital revenues grew by 47%.

Without a doubt, new digital distribution channels have been a game changer for the publishing industry and for a long time many people feared change and what it might mean for their businesses, but we have always seen it as an opportunity. The value of premium content has only increased with the proliferation of sources online. Amid an ever-growing chorus of voices, we’ve found our readers seek out and, importantly, pay for that responsible and authoritative journalism that they can trust.

FT exec backs NYT’s online pay model

by

The New York Times unveiled Thursday its plans to begin charging readers to access some of its content online, following models that have been successfully used by business newspapers The Wall Street Journal and The Financial Times.

Rob Grimshaw, managing director of FT.com, has executed the FT’s strategy to successfully charge for its online content, an effort that began in 2000.

In response to the Times’ plans being unveiled on Thursday, Grimshaw issued the following statement:

The Financial Times believes in the value of quality content and our experience from the last three years is that a metered model is an excellent paid model, allowing access to new and casual users while building a healthy digital subscription business that doesn’t sacrifice traffic or advertising.

The FT pioneered the metered model in 2007 and we’ve seen both digital content and digital advertising revenues rise every year since. Last year, we experienced record growth in online subscribers, double-digital growth in online advertising, and overall digital revenues grew by 47%.

Without a doubt, new digital distribution channels have been a game changer for the publishing industry and for a long time many people feared change and what it might mean for their businesses, but we have always seen it as an opportunity. The value of premium content has only increased with the proliferation of sources online. Amid an ever-growing chorus of voices, we’ve found our readers seek out and, importantly, pay for that responsible and authoritative journalism that they can trust.

FT Alphaville to launch U.S. version of popular “Markets Live”

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FT Alphaville will launch Friday the first U.S. edition of its popular British real-time service, “Markets Live.”

“Markets Live” is a real-time service in which our commentators offer their views on moves and news in the markets in a live streaming-media format

The U.S. version will be different from the daily chat hosted by Neil Hume and Bryce Elder in London.

It will take place every Friday at 10 a.m. EST and will be hosted by FT Alphaville’s New York correspondents, Cardiff Garcia and John McDermott.

As with the British edition, Garcia and McDermott will look at share price moves and other financial asset news, dip into analyst commentary, and engage in the usual banter with the Rabble on the Right.

They’ll also include a recap of each week’s economic indicators and survey the week’s big economic events from around the world. The conversation will frequently feature FT colleagues in Europe, along with business journalists from FT Tilt for emerging markets analysis.

Read more here.