Tag Archives: Educational

Reynolds Center selects 35 fellows

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The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism has selected 35 fellows – 20 journalists and 15 professors – for four days of intensive study in business journalism.

The fellows will attend separate, all-expenses-paid seminars Jan. 2-5 at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication in Phoenix.  Journalists in the Strictly Financials Seminar learn how to dissect financial statements and SEC documents. Prospective business journalism professors receive training in how to teach a university-level course in business journalism.

“We were impressed by the growing number, quality and commitment of applicants in this sixth year of our annual business journalism seminars,” said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center and the Reynolds Chair in Business Journalism at the Cronkite School. “The global economy and volatile markets have made it clear to everyone that journalists with sophisticated business knowledge provide a needed service to society.”

The seminars, taught by highly regarded business journalists and business journalism professors, are part of Reynolds Business Journalism Week at the Cronkite School. A highlight of the week is a discussion with the legendary investigative-reporting duo of Don Barlett and Jim Steele, along with the 2011 winners of the Reynolds Center’s Barlett & Steele Awards for Investigative Business Journalism.

Read more here.

The earnestness of Chinese students studying business journalism

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Joe Weber, the University of Nebraska business journalism professor who is spending a semester in China to teach, writes about how college students there are so eager to learn about how to cover business and the economy.

Weber writes, “These kids know what matters in the world and they know it’s not sports or entertainment. Every week, 30 motivated students come to class to wrestle with high concepts like comparative advantage and more pedestrian ones such as earnings per share. Each time, they’ve read the several chapters I assigned, as proved by the perfect scores (including answers to extra-credit questions) many get on my quizzes. They ask smart questions that make me think, some sending me to the reference books for answers. They pay attention. They can’t get enough of it all.

“I ask them to compare coverage in different publications. Using Power Point presentations graced with artwork – leaves that flutter and drop is my favorite so far – they stand in front of the class and break down stories in such pubs as the Wall Street Journal and New York Times, as well as China Daily, and offerings by Reuters and Bloomberg. They discuss quotes (quality and quantity), numbers and levels of sources, variety in viewpoint. They apply every metric you could imagine, from numbers of paragraphs to the use or lack of use of active verbs. They talk about substance and style alike. Their textual analysis skills could humble Ph.D students in literature.

“And these students, master’s candidates, do it all with a sense of innocence, earnestness and openness I rarely see in my undergrads at home. Not once have I heard a sarcastic comment. There’s none of the jadedness, boredom with life or cynicism that afflict American post-adolescents. And it’s not that they are naïve: one went undercover as an intern at his newspaper to work for many weeks in the alienating factory environment of Foxconn, a major manufacturer whose mind-numbing workplace culture may have led to a rash of suicides. He got a series of pieces out of it. Others talk of how police have beaten journalists. Still others talk admiringly of instructors whose investigative work has broken new ground in China.”

Read more here.

Four biz journalists named Reynolds visiting professors

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Four journalists have been named the inaugural Reynolds visiting business journalism professors at Colorado State University, Grambling State University, Texas Christian University and the University of South Carolina under a $1.67 million grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

The five-year program will ultimately create 11 visiting professorships at 11 different schools. It is administered through the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

The inaugural visiting professors, who will teach in the spring semester of 2012, are:

    • Karen Blumenthal at Texas Christian University. Blumenthal, the author of several business books, writes The Wall Street Journal’s “Getting Going” column and is its former Dallas bureau chief.
    • Rob Reuteman at Colorado State University. Reuteman, a freelance business journalist, is a former business editor of the Rocky Mountain News and former president of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.
    • Will Sutton at Grambling State University. Sutton, a former president of the National Association of Black Journalists, has held senior management positions at daily newspapers that include The News & Observer in Raleigh, N.C. He is a former Nieman Fellow.
    • Rob Wells at the University of South Carolina. Wells is deputy bureau chief for Dow Jones/Wall Street Journal in Washington, and previously worked for Bloomberg News and The Associated Press.

The professorships will enable students at the four universities to get valuable training in a specialized and increasingly critical area of journalism, said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center and the Reynolds Chair in Business Journalism at the Cronkite School.

Read more here.

SABEW to hold teletraining session on covering holiday retail season

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The Society of American Business Editors and Writers will hold a teletraining session called “Fresh Ideas for Covering the Holiday Retail Season in a Down Economy” next week.

The hour-long conference call is — note new time — 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern time, Monday, Nov. 14.

The panel includes moderator
 Karen Talley, special writer covering retailers, Dow Jones Newswires
; and panelists
 Maria Halkias, retail writer, The Dallas Morning News; and Andria Cheng, retail reporter, MarketWatch

.

Please RSVP for the event by registering here.

Then, on the day of the event, please call 218-339-2626 and, when prompted, enter the access code 4058935. You’ll be able to hear the panelists but not speak to them. During the call, listeners may send questions via e-mail to sabew@sabew.org. Selected questions will be forwarded to the moderator for the panel to answer.

The call is presented as a free service by SABEW, the largest organization of business journalists in the world.

Reynolds Center offering business journalism fellowships in January

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The Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism is offering fellowships worth $2,000 for four days of study in business journalism Jan. 2-5 in Phoenix.

Fellowships cover training, lodging, materials and most meals. Fellows receive a $500 stipend to offset travel and other costs.

Deadline to apply online is Nov. 1.

The journalists’ Strictly Financials Seminar teaches the essentials of covering financials, from stock markets and bonds to financial statements and company research.The Business Journalism Professors Seminar covers the essentials of teaching a university course in business journalism.

The seminars will occur during Reynolds Business Journalism Week at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

The sixth annual, concurrent seminars will be led by award-winning professors and journalists, including New York Times reporter Diana B. Henriques, author of “The Wizard of Lies” about the Bernie Madoff scandal.

Rachel Tobin, business reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, said her 2010 fellowship to the Strictly Financials Seminar “gave me much more confidence in my financial reporting, has allowed me to ask better and smarter questions, and overall improved my coverage. I cannot thank the Reynolds Center enough for this amazing course.”

For more information, contact Reynolds Center President Andrew Leckey at andrew.leckey@businessjournalism.org.

Read more here.

Four universities to receive visiting biz journalism professors

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Journalism programs at Colorado State University, Grambling State University, Texas Christian University and the University of South Carolina will be the first schools to receive visiting business journalism professors next spring under a $1.67 million grant from the Donald W. Reynolds Foundation.

The five-year program will ultimately create 11 visiting professorships at 11 different schools. It is administered through the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism at Arizona State University’s Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

“We are pleased with the first four schools selected to participate in the Reynolds Visiting Business Journalism Professor Program,” said Steve Anderson, president of the Reynolds Foundation. “These four schools will form the nucleus of a much larger group of institutions that will be selected annually over the next five years. The program’s goal is to select institutions that will commit long-term to the teaching of principles and skills necessary to train business journalists in what we believe is an increasingly important field of journalism.”

The new Reynolds Visiting Professorships are modeled on successful programs at Washington and Lee University and the Cronkite School. The Reynolds Center also has sponsored a weeklong training seminar for prospective business journalism professors for the past five years.

The professorships will enable students at the four universities to get valuable training in a specialized and increasingly critical area of journalism, said Andrew Leckey, president of the Reynolds Center.

Read more here.

More spots available for Wharton program for business journalists

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The Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists announced Friday that up to 10 additional journalists may receive scholarships that include free domestic round trip air travel and tuition to the renowned program’s flagship program Oct. 9 to Oct. 12 on the University of Pennsylvania’s Philadelphia campus.

Journalists from Western U.S. media markets are especially encouraged to apply. Besides airfare, the scholarship covers tuition, course materials, and most meals (but not lodging).

The Wharton Seminars for Business Journalists, now in its 43rd year, offers participants an opportunity to expand their business knowledge and increase their exposure to experts. Through lectures and exercises, the program, led by the Wharton School’s most prominent professors, helps participants gain better understanding of key business and economic issues.

Classes are held on the University of Pennsylvania campus at Wharton’s Jon M. Huntsman Hall in Philadelphia. Participants are encouraged to secure lodging as soon as possible. More information is available on the seminar’s home page.

For those not chosen for a scholarship, the program cost is $1,995, with a payment date of Oct. 1.

Applications are open to those employed full time as a print, broadcast, or online business journalist for legitimate media companies.

For more information, go here. I am a 1993 graduate of the program, and the program is excellent.

SABEW to hold training call on covering the economy

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The Society of American Business Editors and Writers plans to hold a training conference call later this month on covering national and local economic stories.

The call will be held on Sept. 26 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. EST.

This session will give journalists a better understanding of the direction of the national economy as well as insight into how they can track and cover their own regional economies. The call will also teach listeners how to tap into Bureau of Economic Analysis data and other economic resources.

On the call will be Adolfo Laurenti, deputy chief economist, Mesirow Financial, and Mike Schneider, correspondent and computer mapping specialist, The Associated Press, as well as a Bureau of Economic Analysis representative. The call is being moderated by Daniel Burns, financial training editor for the Americas, Reuters.

Please RSVP for the event by registering here. Then, on the day of the event, please call 218-339-2626 and, when prompted, enter the access code 4058935. You’ll be able to hear the panelists but not speak to them.

During the call, listeners may send questions via e-mail to sabew@sabew.org. Selected questions will be forwarded to the moderator for the panel to answer.

SABEW to hold training call on writing and reporting investigative stories

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The Society of American Business Editors and Writers will hold a training call on Monday, July 25, for business journalists interested in learning tips about investigative stories.

The call will be held from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. EST.

The moderator for the call will be Chicago Tribune reporter Jason Grotto. The panelists for the call will include Investigative Reporters and Editors executive director Mark Horvit, investigative reporter Robert Cribb of the Toronto Star, and Scott Eden, a freelance journalist who was recently on the staff of TheStreet.com

Please RSVP for the event by registering here. Then, on the day of the event, please call 218-339-2626 and, when prompted, enter the access code 4058935. You’ll be able to hear the panelists but not speak to them. During the call, listeners may send questions via e-mail to sabew@sabew.org.

Selected questions will be forwarded to the moderator for the panel to answer.

Contact SABEW board member and training committee co-chair Mary Jane Pardue of Missouri State University, mjpardue@missouristate.edu or (417) 889-9438, if you have questions.

Tips on better gas price coverage

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The Society of American Business Editors and Writers is holding a conference call next week for journalists interested in tips from business reporters on covering the gas price story.

The call, which will be held May 23 at 3 p.m. EST, will provide access to the experts who are tracking gas prices and their impact on consumers, the economy and local communities. You’ll also get tips from energy journalists about how to cover and localize this important story.

The moderator will be Chris Kahn, energy writer for The Associated Press.

The panelists on the call will be James Coan, research associate for the Energy Forum at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University; Neil Gamson, Energy Information Administration; and Russell Gold, energy writer in The Wall Street Journal’s Houston bureau.

Sign up here for the approximately one-hour call.

At the time and date of the call, dial 218-339-2626, then at the prompt, enter this access code: 4058935. You’ll be able to hear the panelists but not speak to them. During the call, listeners may send questions via e-mail to sabew@sabew.org. Selected questions will be forwarded to the moderator for the panel to answer.